yurts: the downside

We love our yurt. I am really glad we decided to go this route.

But no space is perfect in all ways, and yurts are no exception. After nearly four years in ours, here is the unvarnished truth to living in a gigantic, glorified tent.

Sound

If you put up your yurt on a mountaintop, 100 acres from your nearest neighbor, this one will not be a problem. It is lovely to lie in bed at night and hear the owls and frogs and deer doing their nighttime thang in the woods around our yurt. You can hear it all, and when the sounds are good, this is a good thing. However, we can also here the neighbors coming and going, hear the folks down the road giving a party, and rainstorms make shouting a necessity. There is NO sound proofing to the walls of a yurt. When the fan on our waterstove started rattling, it kept me awake at night, even though it is outside and fifty feet from the wall. Yuck.

And don’t forget sounds goes both ways. If you listen to music, fight with your spouse, or, say, have a really good time with your spouse, ahem, the neighbors will hear you. Forget the privacy you may be accustomed to with six-inch thick, standard construction, insulated walls. Sound goes straight through a yurt skin. So give your yurt a lot of space around it to compensate.

Temperature

Yurts are HOT. At least ours is. They were designed for Mongolia where it’s freaking freezing, so, duh. But if you’re thinking of putting a yurt anywhere where the days get over 80 or 85 degrees, you are going to want an air conditioner or you are NOT going to want to be in your yurt during the afternoons. We have a large window unit, backed up to one of the windows and resting on a 55 gallon steel drum, that does pretty well keeping us cool, until outside temps get over 95—and then it’s just not powerful enough to keep the yurt cooler than 80. Without the air conditioner, if we open all the windows, and there is a good breeze, it’s, well its still totally hot, but the breeze does blow straight through, and that can be nice. For a minute. Until the breeze stops. A friend of mine who got a yurt (that she adored in the winter) had to move out in the summer. She couldn’t draw enough electricity to run an air conditioner and her yurt was unbearably hot three months out of the year. And did I mention the dome casting a huge circle of heat, starting on one side of the yurt and working its way across, like a giant heat lamp, each day? Basically, without the breeze or the air conditioner what we have here is a big solar cooker. And we are the roast chicken.

However, yurts warm up well when it’s cold. We’re toasty during the winter with our heating set up (see waterstove link above). It would be interesting to see an infrared photo of the yurt—I wonder if there is heat just pouring out of the acrylic dome. Probably. One thing to consider is this is a BIG volume of space for the square footage. We have 16 foot peak in the center, and all of that space up there gets heated before the humans down on the floor feel it. Our propane heater is rated for 60,000 BTUs and it can heat the place to hot, if we’re willing to pay for the fuel (which we’re not). Anything less and you’d be cold, I think.

Bottom line: when the temperature outside changes, the temperature inside the yurt changes. It’s pretty easy to adjust it, but yurts do not hold a temperature the way some other building styles do. Our super-insulated bathhouse stays cool all summer, minus the hottest days of August, with no air conditioning at all. And we heat it comfortably with a small space heater for about $10-$20 a month in winter. In comparison, we pump a lot of energy, whether electrical (for cooling), propane or wood (for heating) into changing our inside temperature. Heating and cooling are not the yurt’s strong points.

ETA: Paul wanted me to put in that the walls and ceiling of the yurt meet the minimum R-values for insulation in our state. He couldn’t remember what those are, maybe R-10 for the walls and maybe R-19 for ceilings…? At any rate, the R-value of the foil-covered-bubblewrap insulation that is on our yurt is lowish, but within the range of building norms. However, the vinyl windows and the acrylic dome are big heat loss points.

Rain

No, our yurt does not leak. It is tight as a drum. BUT. Having never been in a structure with absolutely no overhang before, I really didn’t get how rain would run down the long expanse of roof and then come right in through the windows. And because the yurt skin is a pliable fabric, the rain curves down, around, and vroom! shoots straight in like someone pointing a hose through screen. I only had to test THAT out once. You HAVE to close the windows when it rains. OR you HAVE to have good awnings. Maybe good gutters would be enough in a light rain. I wish we had gutters! My biggest regret, besides not putting in radiant floor heating, is not getting the gutters.

In addition, the windows open and close, at least on our yurt, on the outside. So, in order to open and close them, you have to be outside, too. It’s not a big deal, but it’s a bit of a pain in the patooty to run out into the rain to unroll and zip.

Our solution to all of this is just to rarely open the windows. We have two doors on opposite sides of the yurt, and these are almost constantly open, unless the heat or air conditioner are on. Both have gutters and awnings. And since the space is small (our 30 foot yurt is about 700 square feet) this usually gives plenty of airflow for a nice spring day like today. We only open windows when we know we’re going to be home and there is no rain on the forecast. But that’s not very often. If you’re thinking of getting a yurt, get the gutters. And get screen doors so you can use the doors as your windows when you don’t want to mess with the whole rolling and zipping routine.

Storage

We have none! What I wouldn’t give for a pantry! Paul built an amazing, freestanding, closet/bookshelf (closets on the ‘bedroom’ side and bookshelves on the ‘living room’ side) that divides our yurt into two areas. In addition to that we have a wardrobe for coats (overflowing), and a hutch and some shelves in our kitchen. But, basically, we end up with stuff everywhere and no good place to put it. Of course, we are four people living in our yurt, so if a person was on his or her own, this may be less of a problem. But there is no junk room, no attic, no basement, no spare bedroom, no closets, no pantry, no mudroom, none of those spaces in a more traditional house where you stick your stuff. This is because yurts were designed by nomads. They didn’t have much because whatever they had, they were going to have to hump it somewhere else pretty soon. Depending on one’s propensity to acquire stuff, this lack of storage can be quite a problem. For us, basically, we’re screwed.

But that’s about it. There are some difficulties with privacy/sound at night, particularly when some of us want to sleep and others of us do not, but that is more of an issue of four people in one room, than a problem with yurts per se. We’ve solved some of that with things like wireless headsets for the tv, for example. And just being thoughtful.

But, like I said, we love our yurt. It’s a beautiful, light-filled, affordable, fast, comfortable space. For us, moving onto this land with very little money and a high time-pressure (I was pregnant, our lease was up, tick-tock-tick), it has been perfect.

Check out the ‘yurts’ tag for other posts on our yurt, such a series on how we prepared the site, built a platform and then, finally, put up our yurt in one day, or this one on what it’s like to live inside a sundial.

41 thoughts on “yurts: the downside

  1. Anthony

    Hi Maya, great job on your yurt and your helpful posting. I have a 30′ Yurt and you are correct, no dwelling is perfect. I hope you don’t get in trouble with the yurt police that seems to take great offense at any suggestion they are less than perfect. Great… YES! Perfect…. No!

    I am surprised however about your comment on the heat. I could not tell from your pictures if your acrylic dome is fixed or has the little mechanism that allows you to lift one edge. Mine is operable so it is like a vent and on a hot day, with it open and the windows open there is a tremendous draft that really keeps the temperature down. On a blazing day my yurt is no hotter than sitting in the shade. Not exactly great when it is 90°f and 90% humidity but I’m not “baking”. Consider upgrading to the little mechanism that allows you to raise and lower the dome!

    Also, for the winter, consider a state of the art EPA rated wood stove. They burn a lot more efficiently which means they don’t need to be re-stoked as often AND they create much less pollution. I bought a big one (sized for a 2,500 SF house) for my 30′ yurt and it can burn through the night without needing to be re-stoked. You don’t have to go for a fancy name brand at a boutique stove store, the one I got is available at Lowes, Home Depot, etc. for under $1,000. You do need a tall stove pipe (15′ rise) and it is VERY expensive, figure another $1,000 for the pipe! I just mention this because it gives off a really cozy, steady, heat that makes the yurt really comfy even on the coldest days.

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hello Anthony, thanks for stopping by, always a pleasure to meet another yurt dweller!

      About the heat, well part of our problem is half our windows are too high for us to reach to open (we’re on a hill). The plan is to have a deck there at some point, but it’s low on the list. So we don’t do well with the cross breeze. But also, where we live, 95 degrees outside in the summer is common. Too hot anywhere. We can open the dome, but I haven’t found that it makes much difference.

      And in the winter, we do really well, stay nice and snug. We have an outdoor waterstove (I have a post on that if you’re curious) that heats water, sent through a pipe into a radiator inside the yurt. Very nice.

      I’d love to hear where your yurt is, how long you’ve lived in it. And I didn’t know there was a yurt police! Crap! I’m sure I’m in trouble now…

      Reply
  2. Steve

    Having deja vu reading your blog! We live in a 30 foot yurt on a hill on an island in the Pacific Northwest. It doesn’t get as hot outside as it does where you live, but even still the summer temps inside the yurt are brutal. As I type this I am in the middle of redesigning the inside of the yurt- thinking about adding a loft with a bath/shower underneath. And storage. And a deck. And a cover for the front porch…..ad nauseum.
    We used to raise goats as well. They were Saanen, big and white. I mainly used them to clear the land to build our garden. Now we just have cats and chickens.

    Glad we are not the only ones out there “crazy” enough to raise kids in a glorified tent.

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hello Steve, welcome! Yes, the yurt in the heat is a bit awful for us. I understand the ad nauseum! We often find ourselves musing about how one could turn the glorified tent into a more permanent structure with solid walls, real insulation, and real windows, without just taking it down and building such on the platform. Spray insulation and a layer of gypsum or some kind of plaster on the interior walls? Cut the lattice? Add on thickness external to the lattice? How much weight could this structure really take if you wanted to put on a real roof? Etc. Just fooling around with ideas.
      Yes, I’ve seen Saanen goats, they’re beautiful. I think crazy yurt dwelling, goat raising types are an actual demographic nowadays. You aren’t as freaky as you think anymore, :).

      Reply
  3. Sherri

    I just stumbled upon your site, it is wonderful. Hubby & I and the 3 kids (boys 2,3,5) have decided to abandon the rat race!. We were researching a yurt and based on your experiences will defiantly get the “real” windows and the opening dome. We live in Ontario, Canada so insulation and some extras are a must (damn our Canadian winters) We call ourselves “microfarmers” also (berkshire pigs, chicken, kids) we were adding a Dexter cow but my neighbour complained and we realized to our shock and dismay that our realtor lied and we are not zoned for animals (live and learn, then bitch) so long story short we have 2 months to get rid of all our animals but we can keep the kids. I would love your advice on this lifestyle, I will be combing thru your site but if I may ask: where are you? how much land do you have? and how do you find your financial life with this lifestyle? We will be selling (fingers crossed) our hugely mortgaged farm for cheap (hard to find in Ontario)land (without neighbours, thank you very much) and building a yurt. Goal: self sufficient asap, only 1 person working outside the home. I would love your ideas & advice.

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hi Sherri, nice to meet you. We are in North Carolina, USA. We have about seven acres, but we only use a couple of those for our living area. The rest is wild and we play and walk on it. Paul has the paying job and I stay home. We do all right, but we have fairly simple needs, food, clothes, ipods, wi-fi, you know, the essentials. There is always more stuff to want than there is money to buy it, no matter the income level, so you just get used to it…although maybe there is an upper limit to that, like maybe it isn’t true for Bill Gates? Using recycled stuff helps. Oops, lightning flash, I better get off before the power flickers…

      Reply
  4. Terry & Candice

    We are just in the begining stages of building a 30′ Yurt to live in.
    We have a plot of land in NB, Canada. We intend to build from sctrach and would appreciate any advise.

    Thanks….

    Reply
  5. Chloe

    hi all!

    on the flip side to many of you: i am the kid who might be moving into a yurt! My family, tired of living within the confines of the social norm and looking to live a more down to earth existence is seriously looking into it! I am really looking forward to the possibility and hope that the final answer is a “yes” from the parents… any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated!

    btw, we live in northern NH. Quite cold in the winter but not too hot in the summer…

    Reply
  6. asia szrek

    I love your entry on yurts! It sounds like you’re our neighbor. We make yurts in the Asheville area and all over!! And it’s true, there’s so much you can choose to do with your yurt, so many things to add/ improve/ you name it, you’d never stop!!! glad to see you yurtin’ in style!! Feel free to check out our blog, too, lots of fun info on yurts and other sustainability stuff that interests me. Asia
    laurelnest.com

    Reply
  7. Steph

    My Hubby and 2 kids 17 & 19 have been living in a 30 foot yurt for 6 years now. It has been a geat home for us and we have enjoyed the adventure of living in it and the way it makes you in touch with the seasons. Summer is hot here in central california and my husband invented a pergola shade structure that we use for the hot part of the year. We take down the dome and put up the pergola. We also put up the swap cooler in the second doorway we got for this purpose. We have solar power and we can run the swap cooler in the day not at night and we enjoy sleeping outside in summer. Come winter we take the pergola down and store it until next year. Then we take a down the swap chiller. get our wood stove cleaned and ready to be in service for the winter. Summer is definitely our harshest season here. Our winters are pretty mild, but we do get down to freezing at night. Most days when it is sunny I don’t even have to have a fire in the stove and we are cozy. Anyway,I couold go on for a long time about yurts. I think they are so far superior to mobile homes. The tiny spaces,the cheap, out- gassing crap materials they are made of just don’t compare to a beautiful, open,light-filled yurt.

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Wow, you live in a yurt with two teen-agers?!? You have room for that? We are BUSTING OUT of our yurt and our kids are 5 and 6. Do you have rooms built into your yurt? We struggle with divergent activities, such a sleeping and playing a game, all in one ‘room.’ I can’t wait to have our bedroom built for just this reason. That’s cool all your innovations. The pergola sounds great.

      Reply
  8. Yurt Welcome

    If you are concerned about having to heat the upper part of your yurt, why not block that part off during part of the winter? Plastic would let the light in and stop air currents, and some reflective blanket with a plastic part might do even better. As for noise, there are certainly other things you can do to soundproof part of the yurt. Can’t sleep? Ear plugs and full protectors might help. What do builders, musicians, etc. do to reduce noise in temporary or rental situations?

    How about going really green and re-using a shipping container to act as a sound barrier and modular/stackable framework for a building?

    Radiant flooring does sound like a good idea.

    Reply
  9. Mike

    Hi Maya (& fellow Yurt dwellers),
    I have just purchased a 28′ Yurt, but it has not been delivered yet. I live in Ontario Canada & am looking to find someone who can actually build it for me…. I am having a concrete foundation poured for it to sit on so there would be no messing around with decking just building it…. If you know of anybody that can help it would be greatly appreciated!! Our location is about an hour north west of Toronto Ontario so if anybody out there that knows how to build a Yurt would like a couple of days of work please let me know…

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      We’re, like, 2000 miles away from you! How could we possibly find you someone to build your yurt? 🙂 Seriously, good luck with your new project! Yurts are super fun.

      Reply
  10. Corina Rose

    Hi fellow yurt dwellers.
    I live in a 30′ yurt in Vermont. I have gone through 3 winters and am finally adding “real” insulation.
    I am putting in R23 Roxul (stone mineral wool) insulation.
    I am tired of the work it takes to heat the place and I have a great wood stove but several cords of wood is crazy to me for such a small space. I am also adding propane backup so I can leave it for more that 8 hours in the winter.
    I have real windows and an operable dome and it still gets hot in here. I leave both doors open (with screens) in the summer with fans on, no air conditioners for me– but I am hoping with insulation that will change too.
    I am just finally getting running water and electricity into the yurt–so no more hauling water in and out.
    I love living in the round but honestly think if you are looking for a permanent set-up, Smilingwoodsyurts is the way to go. Ultimately will end up costing less or about the same-if you do it yourself.
    I live on 5 acres and love my land and living in the round.
    Best to you
    Corina

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hi Corina, Nice to meet you! I wonder, if you come back to this post do tell me, how are you installing the insulation? What will be the interior wall surface? We have thought a lot about real insulation but haven’t nailed down a strategy (plus it isn’t top of the to do list yet). H has suggested spray foam insulation to fill all the spaces in between the rafters, but then I’m always saying, dude, that will look like crap, plus it stinks. I’d love to have real windows, wish we had ponied up for at least one, now. Oh well. We didn’t realize, when we were buying the yurt, how permanent it was going to end up being for us. I would be surprised if we aren’t still in it ten years from now, that will be 18 years in at that point, my son’s entire life.

      Reply
  11. Mark and Ginny

    Hi Maya,
    I was looking for info on heating a yurt and found you! My wife and I move into our 30 footer in two weeks. Thanks for your balanced reality on yurts. We just moved onto 17 acres in Mars Hill, NC, with our daughter and her husband, and we are very excited.
    I used to write sci-fi 30 years ago; now, I’m a freelance copyeditor for a couple of publishers. And I do some late-night stand up.
    I’m happy to have found you and will share with family and friends. Mark

    Reply
  12. Heather

    I’m so glad I happened upon this. I would like to purchase a Yurt to live in with my husband and our children on his father’s land. This would be affordable and not wasteful for us. I too am a writer and I would also like to raise goats and sheep on the land that would be ours there. This was really helpful to know what to expect. Does your Yurt have indoor plumbing? I know you can get Yurts that do have bathrooms and kitchen sinks, but you didn’t mention that, so I was unsure! Thank you!

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hello Heather, nice to meet you! No, our yurt didn’t come with plumbing or anything interior, just the yurt. My husband put in cabinetry, and closets, a plumber installed a kitchen, an electrician wired it. Our bathroom in in a separate, adjacent structure, the bathhouse, plumbed by a plumber. Good luck with your yurt adventure!

      Reply
  13. Linda

    My DH and I along with our DD and her family just bought 40 acres on NE Washington to homestead. We were planning on earthbag domes (no clay at all) and thought about straw bale. DH suggested homemade Yurts, setting up early Spring then surrounding them with hay bales and tarps for the winter. As soon as possible the next Summer we would have some clay hauled in to cob the outside and treat the inside as wattle and daub. Hopefully this sounds feasible. As the yurt won’t ever intended to be portable, we wold use small logs as rafters so we could use metal at some point. Off on a new adventure 🙂

    Reply
  14. Trevor Green

    I’m curious why you don’t buy more Yurts? Certainly I understand money issues, but you could get the 12′ ones as bedrooms for your children for 5k a piece, and since you likely don’t have much in the way of a mortgage why would you not just expand? I’m looking at Yurts and imagining having a 30 foot central house and 3 or 4 adjacent bedroom units. And I think that would still be far cheaper than what I’m paying for a mortgage now. No judgement here, I’m just curious. I see a lot of people talking about the limitations of Yurts but they all seem to talk about specific configurations of one yurt. And I don’t understand why with the prices. Is it just that most people that have yurts are that limited in their budget? What am I missing? From what I can tell the quality of Yurt living is just limited by how much you put into it. Other than the sound issue that is. Probably something that you could mitigate with a solid wall yurt?

    I’d like to find someone with a complete list of what is needed for a bullet proof yurt situation.

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      I really have no idea what a “bullet proof” yurt situation is. The idea of many yurts is not very attractive to me, partly because they are, ultimately, temporary structures–glorified tents–and while that is great for speed, doesn’t feel so great for long term house-i’m-going-to-grow-old-in. In addition, with younger kids, they don’t want to be in a separate building at night. Too spooky. That would be different with teens. Plus, there is a ton of work that goes into setting up a yurt, the platform, wiring, etc. If you’re going to do all that, for 5-10 grand you can get a solid building that will be much more insulated and permanent. Having one big central yurt and several other smaller buildings is what we’ve got at this point (this post is several years old). The yurt, the bathhouse, the Noah house (kind of a play studio), and on its way, the bedroom (for me and husband). We also have a bus we might convert in the future, for one of the kids, if they want it.

      There is no perfect answer, no perfect living configuration. Family needs change, weather changes, there are pros and cons to everything. I like living in our yurt, but there are problems to it, too, just like any building.

      Reply
  15. Ruth

    I love the honesty of your post. I also think it was super brave to make such a leap at any point and especially while pregnant. just stayed in a yurt for the first time. At Maine forest yurts. It was amazing. My husband and I have been looking at alternatives to the rat race and hug home and renting prices and this seems like a great solution. I wonder if you could speak about the long term prospects of living in a yurt…it seems like a temporary solution–I have 6 and 4 y/o boys and can relate regarding storage ????

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Long term with two kids, I’m not going to lie: it’s not optimal. I wrote that post quite a while ago, we’ve now been in the yurt for nine years, the kids are 11 and 9, and yeah, it’s too small. There is not enough privacy. We’re on top of each other will our stuff and our activities. We’re close, and that’s good, but its really important to have a room away. The bathhouse does that some. And we’ve got the Noah house and soon a separate bedroom for the adults (finally). You’ve got to think about having teen agers–it might seem like forever away but it comes up super fast. Teenagers need privacy, adults need privacy from teens. The yurt was terrific for the first five years. It has been progressively less terrific as time goes by. I think it will be good again when the bedroom gets finished. 🙂 Then we might do the interior of our bus…gaming bus! In other cultures, four generations live on top of each other in this much space, so it isn’t like its impossible. But we all crave more privacy at this point.

      Reply
  16. Carisa

    Hi Maya,

    Ahhh I love your article, so funny, refreshing and totally true! I built my yurt 15 years ago and lived in it year round in upstate NY for 10 years. A month ago I took the yurt down for the first time ever to redo the floor and put radiant floor in, fix the canvas and windows. My plan is to get a new door, a screen for it, gutters and radiant floors. I am hoping that this makes it a little more pleasant. I don’t think the gutters will totally work because when the wind blows the rain comes right in through the screens. Thank you so much for sharing your yurt story 🙂

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hi Carisa, nice to meet you! That’s nice to hear of a yurt getting a refresh. I have wondered what we will do as it ages. We’ve been in it for ten years now and it’s holding up well, but its easy to see that it isn’t going to last forever. I hope your renovations give you another decade of happy yurt living!

      Reply
  17. davidd

    I just ran across this post while looking for bathroom alternatives for yurt living. We just purchased a property in Utah that consists of three yurts to which we will be moving in the next two weeks (mid-September 2015).

    Yurt living was NOT on our radar when we started looking for affordable properties, but the setting was too beautiful to pass up. Now, though, my wife, in particular, is starting to wonder what kind of strange mess we may have gotten ourselves into!

    Your observations about generally staying warm enough in the winter are reassuring, as that is our main concern at this point with fall already upon us. While the main yurt, a 30-footer, on the property currently has an interior bathroom, it’s a little bit funky. We’re going to look at the possibility of adding some kind of extension, a master bedroom-bath, to the side of the yurt… maybe?

    This is going to be an adventure, for sure! A dramatic lifestyle change! I’m going to look through the rest of your site now — I hope to find some details of the bathhouse you mention in this post.

    Reply
  18. Astonished

    Gosh why didn’t you just buy a properly built & insulated MOBILE HOME?
    Yurks seem like tee-pees for the mentally challenged.
    Jeez, you couldn’t pay me to live in a yurt after reading your article about it.
    But ‘each to their own’ (ideas) I suppose.

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Did you just come to my blog and insult me right here in my own comments? Why yes, I think you did. We didn’t buy a mobile home because THEY ARE UGLY. And we didn’t want to live in an ugly house with tiny rooms. Everything has a pro and con list. This is a list of some of the cons of yurt living. There is a pro list to yurt living, too, this post just isn’t it.

      Reply
  19. Annie

    Hello Maya. Just happened across you blog. Yes, that was an insult. It takes all kinds. Interesting that Astonished took the time to read your entire blog, then criticize your lifestyle.. I am in the process of buying some land in Northern NH. Would love to live in a yurt and have a place for my grandkids to come visit and get away from the city. I’m a 63 yo single female and not very handy so I will need the whole process compiled for me. Can you or any of your readers please let me know where to begin.? Will the yurt company do everything? i.e. Permits, septic, plumbing etc? Or will I need a building contractor?

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      You will need a contractor. The yurt company doesn’t do anything but sell you the kit. Good luck!

      Reply
  20. Kurt Hein

    Thank you for writing so honestly about the negative aspects of the yurt life. I live near Austin, TX and it gets brutal hot in the summer 100+. Do you think yurt living is out of the question due to the difficulty in keeping them cool? Would you know any yurt people in a similar habitat that I could talk to?

    Peace,
    Kurt

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hello Kurt, I knew a gal in California who had to abandon her yurt in the summer, just too hot. I think, if it is like my yurt, you would have to have an air conditioner plan. If you get nice breeze where you are, possibly having many open windows could work, still very hot, but maybe livable. I mean, people lived in TX without air conditioning for thousands of years, it’s possible. But yeah, yurts are not cool structures. You want thick walls for cool, and yurts are not that. Good luck!

      Reply
  21. Myra bagley

    My husband wants to put several small yurts on our property in the blue ridge mountains of va. I agreed if the spare bedroom, a real structure, was built first. my concern is depreciation as this will be my long term care insurance if I should be left alone. He wants to use the yurts for air b and bs , do they appreciate a home, should I insist on a spare bedroom first?

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Hi Myra, well, there is no way for me to know what you should do! 🙂 They do not gain value the way a house house does. A village of air bnbs could be fun, if you are in an area with lots of tourists. They aren’t long term structures, so if you are wanting long term security, these aren’t it. More in the twenty year range, I’d say.

      Reply
  22. Andrea

    Hi Myra, I want to put a yurt up in northern Florida for full time living. Nowhere can I find out how safe yurts would be in lightning storms, and since it is the lightning capital, it’s a concern for me. Any ideas or have you ever read anything about that?

    Reply
    1. maya Post author

      Sorry, I just don’t know. I do know they are hot. Air conditioning would be a must in florida, I think.

      Reply

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